Read the TechNews Online at: http://technews.acm.org
ACM TechNews
July 7, 2006

MemberNet
The ACM Professional Development Centre
Unsubscribe

Welcome to the July 7, 2006 edition of ACM TechNews, providing timely information for IT professionals three times a week.

Sponsored by
Learn more about Texis, the text-oriented database 
providing high-performance search engine features combined with SQL 
operations and a development toolkit, that powers many diverse 
applications, including Webinator and the Thunderstone Search Appliance.
Learn more about Texis, the text-oriented database providing high-performance search engine features combined with SQL operations and a development toolkit, that powers many diverse applications, including Webinator and the Thunderstone Search Appliance.


HEADLINES AT A GLANCE:

 

Carnegie Mellon Computer Poker Program Sets Its Own Texas Hold'Em Strategy
Carnegie Mellon News (07/06/06)

A Carnegie Mellon researcher has developed a computer program based on game theory that, while unable to defeat the world's leading players, bested two leading "pokerbots" that rely on human expertise. Instead of drawing on human knowledge, GS1, developed by computer science professor Tuomas Sandholm and graduate student Andrew Gilpin, relies on an automated analysis of the rules of poker. Just as chess was an early test of the limits of artificial intelligence, today poker is a more sophisticated challenge because it requires players to make decisions without knowing what cards the other players are holding. The sheer volume of potential combinations of bets and cards dealt and on the table--a billion times a billion--is too large for even the most sophisticated computers to be able to analyze every hand. The element of the unknown makes poker a better test of the practical potential of artificial intelligence, Sandholm says. "A lot of real-world situations have uncertainty in them and you have to deal with the uncertainty," he said, adding that a poker algorithm could be used in sequential negotiation and auctions in e-commerce applications. Sandholm is a prominent researcher in e-commerce, having developed the fastest algorithms for pairing supply and demand and applied artificial intelligence to automatically set rules for electronic auctions and negotiations. In his poker system, the computer precalculates the strategies for the first two rounds of Hold'Em, then updates the probability of each potential hand for the third and fourth round by factoring in betting and the revealed cards. In an attempt to identify strategically different hands, the pokerbot first groups strategically equivalent hands together, and then strategically similar hands until it arrives at a small enough number of groups that it can perform a computational analysis.
Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


SCinet Satisfies the Need for Speed
HPC Wire (07/07/06) Vol. 15, No. 27,Feldman, Michael

Though the 2006 Supercomputing Conference does not take place until November in Tampa, efforts to create the conference's network, SCinet, began at the end of last year. SCinet will provide comprehensive support for the conference's networking activities, including standard commodity use for the attendees and high-speed communications for the various exhibits and demonstrations. Much of the infrastructure for the network is donated by vendors, and more than 100 volunteers from universities, national labs, supercomputing centers, and other groups are collaborating on the development of SCinet. SCinet consists of three networks: the high-performance network that supports demonstrations and the HPC Bandwidth Challenge with a 10 GB Ethernet connection; the stable and reliable commodity network that offers universal wireless access for all conference attendees; and Xnet, the bleeding-edge network that, though not as reliable as the other two networks, will be used to showcase next-generation technologies. Xnet is always a bit of a gamble for conference organizers. "The rule is that it can't do anything that would endanger the stability of the other networks," said Dennis Duke, SCinet chairman for 2006. "Apart from that, they can do anything they want. Last year, they set up an InfiniBand network that actually carried some wide area network traffic--very dramatic and successful." The HPC Bandwidth Challenge, always a popular event, this year will focus more on production-level networking than raw speed, emphasizing sustainability over peak performance. Each year, the conference faces the challenge of upgrading the hosting city's infrastructure to accommodate its bandwidth demands.
Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


43rd Design Automation Conference to Feature 44 New Exhibitors
Business Wire (07/05/06)

Nearly 250 companies will showcase design tools, services, and technology during ACM SIGDA's 43rd Design Automation Conference (DAC), including 44 that will be exhibiting for the first time. New exhibitors at the premier event of the electronic design automation (EDA) industry include Advanced Circuit Engineers, Barth Electronics, Certicom, Fortelink, Innovative Silicon, Liga Systems, Polyscale Computing, SimPlus Verification, SPACE Codesign, and Western Scientific. "We are very pleased with the number of companies exhibiting for the first time at DAC this year," says Ellen Sentovich, 43rd DAC general chair. "The exhibit floor is a great panorama of the latest trends in the EDA community and this year's new exhibitors will add to the innovative ideas and technologies that emerge each year." The conference will be held at the Moscone Center in San Francisco from July 24-28, 2006. The exhibit will run from Monday, July 24, through Thursday, July 27. For more information about DAC, or to register, visit http://www.dac.com/43rd/index.html
Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


SensorMap Delivers Real-Time Data on the Go
Microsoft Research (07/05/06) Knies, Rob

Microsoft's SensorMap promises to provide people with a customized search experience through a combination of static and real-time data that could, for instance, retrieve a list of local restaurants with a waiting time of less than 30 minutes. The SensorMap platform will act as a portal for publishers who want to make their real-time data searchable. The technology powering SensorMap, developed by Microsoft's Sense Web team, came together around January, and an enhanced prototype received a positive reception at the International Conference on Information Processing in Sensor Networks in April, sponsored by ACM and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The shortage of data right now is the main reason that a system comparable to SensorMap has not yet been developed, says Microsoft's Suman Nath. "Basically, there is this chicken-and-egg problem. There is no application because there is no data, and there is no data because people don't know how useful that data is." Once it collects the information, SensorMap indexes it so that it is searchable. The database that stores the location data works alongside a Web service that publishes sensor data and a server-side query processor. Some Web-based mapping services offer sensor information about weather or traffic, but the maps are not optimized for retrieval of the most relevant information. The system maintains a central database that stores the metadata describing the sensors themselves, and another module that gleans the live data from the sensors, processes that data, and relays it to the users. The most significant challenge is processing the queries on a large, distributed scale, Nath says, though he is encouraged by the way the system has developed so far.
Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


Software Tools Detect Bugs by Inferring Programmer's Intentions
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (07/06/06) Kloeppel, James

University of Illinois computer science professor Yuanyuan Zhou and her students have developed a suite of tools can that identify and correct software bugs by inferring the intentions of the programmer. The tools work by making observations of how the programmer writes code. "Most bug-detection tools require reproduction of bugs during execution," Zhou said. "The program is slowed down significantly and monitored by these tools, which watch for certain types of behavior. Most of our tools, however, work by only examining the source code for defects, requiring little effort from the programmers." Code in large programs is often copied and pasted, which, while saving a significant amount of time, is a frequent cause of bugs. Using data mining techniques, Zhou's CP-Miner searches through programs for copy-pasted code and scans for consistent modifications. CP-Miner, which can scan 3 million to 4 million lines of code in less than 30 minutes, has already found numerous bugs in some of the most popular open-source applications. Since large programs often rely on implicit rules and assumptions, Zhou and her students developed the PR-Miner tool to determine when those rules have been broken. Like CP-Miner, PR-Miner uses data-mining techniques and works very quickly. Zhou and her students have also developed tools to help software keep running even in the presence of bugs, such as the Rx recovery tool. Zhou says, "Rx is avoidance therapy for software failure. If the software fails, Rx rolls the program back to a recent checkpoint, and re-executes the program in a modified environment." Another tool, Triage, identifies and diagnoses the nature of a failure at the end-user site and helps the programmer work to correct it.
Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


Creating a Better Sense of 'Being There' Virtually
IST Results (07/05/06)

In an attempt to determine how close virtual reality can come to simulating the feeling of presence, or "being there," researchers working under the auspices of the OMNIPRES project have developed a host of metrics to gauge a person's response to a virtual reality situation. Creating a convincing sense of presence in a virtual reality environment is critical for many applications, says Wijnand IJsselsteijn, OMNIPRES project coordinator. "In presence engineering we're trying to broaden the human-machine bandwidth," he said. "We need to be able to say how real VR has to be to work therapeutically, which is the measuring component, but also how to improve the sense of reality, which is the research component." The relatively new discipline of presence engineering seeks to enhance humans' technology experience through a scientific study of the senses. To develop more sophisticated, intelligent systems that understand humans' capacities and limitations, it is necessary to study the brain and social interaction, says IJsselsteijn. The OMNIPRES project created a two-part "compendium of presence measures." The first, now available online, is a list of around 30 self-measurement questions designed to assess the experience from the user's standpoint. The second category involves more objective measures, including neural correlates. "Typically, methods of this type are looking for response similarities--testing whether people respond (physically, emotionally, or psychologically) to VR as they do in real life," IJsselsteijn said. Though the project officially concluded last September, the researchers are still developing a handbook that condenses the knowledge acquired over the study.
Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


Open-Source Lobby Weighs in on EU Patent Law
IDG News Service (07/05/06) Meller, Paul

In deciding the future of Europe's patent system, open-source developers are second only to corporations in their influence, according to the European Commission. The business community accounted for 40 percent of the 2,515 written submissions in a consultation led by the Commission earlier this year, while the open-source community contributed 24 percent. Most of the replies from the open-source community were submitted by Florian Mueller, founder of nosoftwarepatents.com, an interest group that succeeded in scuttling an earlier proposal for legislation on software patents. Mueller is fighting efforts for a single, community-wide patent. The current system, which is four times as expensive as the U.S. system, requires inventors to apply to the European Patent Office for a patent, and then register the patent in every country where they plan to use the invention. The community patent, which has been a longstanding goal of European politicians, will receive one more hearing next week, and then the Commission will have to decide whether to go forward with the patent or scrap the project. Though the Commission claims that private enterprise is on its side, some prominent industry groups have lobbied against it, fearing a repeat of the lobbying mess that torpedoed last year's software patent initiative, known as the directive on computer-implemented inventions. "To start a debate about the community patent now would be like opening a Pandora's Box," said Francisco Mingorance of the Business Software Alliance.
Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


DHS Outlines Plan to Protect Critical Telecommunications Infrastructure
RCR Wireless News (07/05/06) Weaver, Heather Forsgren

The federal Department of Homeland Security has released the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) designed to protect U.S. critical infrastructure, including IT and communications networks. Key to the plan will be a risk-management approach that tailors protection according to the characteristics of individual sectors. Each sector has been assigned to a specific department, and essential to the plan will be cooperation from private companies, including the sharing of sometimes confidential information. "The National Infrastructure Protection Plan is the path forward on building and enhancing protective measures for the critical-infrastructure assets and cyber systems that sustain commerce and communities throughout the United States," says Homeland undersecretary for preparedness George Foresman. "The NIPP formalizes and strengthens existing critical-infrastructure partnerships and creates the baseline for how the public and private sectors will work together to build a safer, more secure and resilient America."
Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


Microsoft Warns of 'Acute' UK Skills Shortage
ZDNet UK (07/05/06) Barker, Colin

Microsoft has released a report warning that the United Kingdom faces a critical shortage of workers with programming skills, citing the decline in interest among students since enrollment peaked in preparation for the Y2K bug. The number of applicants in the United Kingdom for degree programs in computer science, engineering, and information systems has dropped to pre-1996 levels. "The UK is facing an acute and growing shortage of high-end software skill," said Microsoft's Michael Bishop. "With the same passion that young people enjoy the music players and computer games which the industry develops, they need to realize that their own future lies in creating the software and the applications that enable those experiences." Other analysts are more optimistic about the situation, though they acknowledge that outsourcing and other challenges make this a difficult time for the industry. The problem affects not only the United Kingdom, claims Elizabeth Sparrow of the British Computer Society, noting that jobs are also being lost in Japan, the United States, and many other countries. The United Kingdom actually enjoys the third-best IT trade surplus in the world, behind India and Ireland, Sparrow says, adding that one of IT's main problems is the issue of perception. "Yes, we need some really, really expert nerds, the ones who are on top of their profession. But for the bulk we need people with a much broader range of skills. That is not well understood and is not being put across to people in schools today," she said. Interest in IT is also undermined by the one-sided media coverage that paints a consistently gloomy picture, overlooking the numerous successes credited to UK computer scientists, said Edward Truch of the University of Lancaster.
Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


Concerns About Fraud Continue to Plague Users of Electronic Voting Machines
Computerworld (07/03/06) Songini, Marc

A new report warns of vulnerabilities in e-voting machines that could disrupt upcoming elections unless precautions are taken. The report was compiled over 18 months by a task force of computer scientists and voting machine experts set up by the Brennan Center for Justice at the New York University School of Law. In recent years, half of manual voting machines throughout the country have been replaced by e-voting systems, such as touch-screen and optical-scan machines, notes Larry Norden, a Brennan Center attorney and chairman of the task force. Election officials have turned to electronic systems to comply with federal requirements, though Norden said security procedures have not necessarily kept pace with the technology. The report identified 120 potential e-voting threats, noting the absence of a detection system for malicious software attacks in most states. Critics of e-voting security include Ion Sancho, elections supervisor for Leon County, Fla., who said the report confirms his gravest fears, but others are less convinced. "The fundamental premise of the Brennan report and many activists is that it's easy to rig a machine to throw an election," said Michael Shamos, a professor at Carnegie Mellon University. "It isn't." The report calls for elections officials to remove wireless components, randomly audit paper records, and decentralize the administration and programming of the machines. Norden said there is still time to implement these precautions before the November elections, and every secretary of state in the country is receiving a copy of the report. For information on ACM's e-voting activities, visit http://www.acm.org/usacm
Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


Battle Lines Drawn Over Net Neutrality
IDG News Service (07/07/06) Gross, Grant

A number of powerful players are coming out both for and against Net neutrality, an issue that is currently being debated in the U.S. Congress. On one side of the debate are broadband providers such as AT&T and BellSouth, which argue that a Net neutrality law would prevent them from exploring new business plans as a way to pay for more advanced broadband networks. Broadband providers also say that they should be free to divide up their broadband pipes to offer services such as IP-based television services. One such business plan that officials from AT&T and BellSouth have advocated in recent months would be to charge e-commerce companies to get preferential routing for traffic to their sites. However, executives at Internet companies such as Amazon.com and Google say they already pay millions of dollars in Internet fees every year. They also say the lack of a Net neutrality law--coupled with recent decisions by the FCC and the U.S. Supreme Court that effectively deregulated broadband--would give broadband providers free rein to block or degrade Web content from competitors such as independent VoIP or video providers. For their part, broadband providers have repeatedly said they will not block or impair their customers' existing access to competing content or services. A number of manufacturers--including Alcatel, Cisco, Corning, and Qualcomm--also say broadband providers do not block or impair competing content. In a May 17 letter to congressional leaders, the manufacturers pointed out that passing a Net neutrality bill risks "hobbling the rapidly developing new technologies and business models of the Internet with rigid, potentially stultifying rules."
Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


Tech Pros Aren't Worried About Losing Jobs, at Least for Now
InformationWeek (07/05/06) McGee, Marianne Kolbasuk

Technology workers are feeling more confident about their job security than they have in years, a new Hudson report finds. The 19 percent that are worried about job losses is the lowest figure since Hudson began conducting monthly job confidence surveys two years ago; in May, 28 percent of tech workers were concerned about job losses. The shifting business practices at many companies are reflected in the improved perception of job security, according to Hudson's Jeff Nicoll. With many companies standardizing business practices such as recruiting, hiring, and backroom operations on a national level, technology workers are enjoying a stronger sense of ownership and empowerment, while also feeling more confident about their contribution to a team effort. Job confidence among technology workers was 108.2, measured against a base score of 100--the highest of all industries surveyed. The average score was 102.4.
Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


How Humanoids Won the Hearts of Japanese Industry
Financial Times (07/03/06) P. 8; Cookson, Clive

More than any other country in the world, Japan has embraced the development of humanoid robots, with projects underway at major companies such as Honda, Toyota, Hitachi, NEC, and Mitsubishi. Sony, the conspicuous exception, pulled the plug on its Aibo and Qrio robots earlier this year due to cost constraints. Today's robots have little commercial appeal because they are prohibitively expensive and generally not intelligent or flexible enough to be particularly useful. "A bipedal walking robot today costs more than a Ferrari," said Hiroshima Hirukawa, who runs the humanoid robot program at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology. "If we can find a nice application and sell a million of them, the price would fall to that of a cheap car." While the entertainment industry currently holds the most promising applications for robots, the ultimate goal is for them to take on monotonous or unpleasant tasks that humans are reluctant or unwilling to do. In countries such as Japan, which has a declining working-age population, robots could be used to care for the elderly. The Japanese are generally more accepting of integrating robots into their everyday lives, a matter that has been the subject of considerable study by sociologists. Though Japan is well ahead of other countries in its robotics programs, manufacturers realize that a mass market will only gradually materialize as robots become smarter and more agile. Japanese robotics professor Takeo Kanade, who has worked at Carnegie Mellon University since 1980, says, "The two biggest mechanical issues are to make them faster and safer in their movements. But those will be easier to solve than giving robots human-like intelligence."
Click Here to View Full Article - Web Link to Publication Homepage
to the top


Flexible Display Technologies to Provide New Twist for Computing
Computerworld (07/03/06) Mitchell, Robert

In the coming decade, flexible substrates such as thin-film polymers could dramatically reshape the way people use displays, with flexible e-paper and roll-up displays poised to become a viable commercial reality. Laptops could soon have a second display that is accessible even when the device is turned off, and some displays could even be embedded in a shirt sleeve or a watch band. "We're talking about electronics we can wrap around a pencil," said Hewlett-Packard's Jim Brug. Rather than replacing existing LCDs, HP and other companies are developing flexible displays, some as large as 14 inches diagonally, to augment current display technology and expand into new surfaces. Creating a flexible display out of conventional LCDs entails eliminating the backlight and substituting a flexible surface for the two layers of glass that sandwich the thin-film transistor layer, which is etched onto glass and embedded in amorphous silicon, as well as the liquid crystal layer. Liquid crystals are resistant to bending, however, and flexing the substrate distorts the image. Among the alternative technologies that companies are currently working on to develop flexible displays are reflective e-paper and emissive organic light-emitting diode (OLED) technologies. As an alternative to amorphous silicon, researchers are exploring the technique of "ink jet" printing, using organic materials to print transistors directly onto a thin polymer sheet. Other possibilities include imprint lithography and stainless-steel foil substrates that are capable of withstanding high temperatures. The first incarnation of e-paper displays has been used in e-book readers, store signage, and retail-shelf price labels. E-paper will become a commercial reality before OLEDs, according to iSuppli's Kimberly Allen.
Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


The Net Reloaded
New Scientist (07/01/06) Vol. 191, No. 2558, P. 40; Krieger, Kim

The discovery of a "power-law" pattern consistent across all different kinds of networks, including the Internet, led to the theory that the Internet could be undone if its most highly connected computers were taken out, but increasing numbers of scientists are disputing this "scale-free" theory. They are crafting postulations that consider the design, evolution, and structure of specific networks, and these theories underlie statistical complex-system modeling techniques. The most commonly accepted explanation for the occurrence of power-law distributions in networks is the concept of preferential attachment, which dictates that well-connected things tend to accrue more and more connections. But John Doyle of the California Institute of Technology argues that because the most highly-connected U.S. Internet routers are situated on the network's fringes, taking these machines down would have no impact on the worldwide flow of most Internet data. "The approach of scale-free models was diametrically opposite to the types of models that are truly useful, which are grounded in specificity," explains MIT science historian Evelyn Fox Keller. Doyle is a vocal advocate for an alternate model of power-law networks that proposes highly optimized tolerance (HOT), based on the idea that a network's evolutionary path is based on what it is designed to do and its physical limitations. The simplest HOT model is the profit-loss resource model, which sums up a complex system as a conflict between the resource and the loss, with the model assuming that the system can be configured in a single optimal manner. Though Harvard University computer scientist Michael Mitzenmacher concedes the usefulness of HOT, he notes that the theory, like preferential attachment, cannot account for all system behavior.
Click Here to View Full Article - Web Link to Publication Homepage
to the top


Take the Agile Path to True Balance
Software Test & Performance (06/06) Vol. 3, No. 6, P. 26; Leffingwell, Dean

Agile software development is superior to the waterfall development model because it supports improved productivity and software quality, and the various agile techniques are consistent in that they enable a team to deliver a small amount of working code in a time box. The agile testing phase is distinctive in that code is tested as it is written, and thus the functional barriers between product owners, developers, and testers are removed. Agile teams adhere to the principles that all code is tested code; that tests are written either prior to or simultaneously with the code itself; that the test writing process requires the participation of all team members; and that a running system baseline is always in effect. There is general consensus between most agile teams that testing practices fall within four primary tiers: unit testing, acceptance testing, component testing, and system and performance testing. Unit testing entails the writing of testing code by developers to test their target code at the module level, while acceptance testing involves functional testing by any stakeholder who can assess any new code that has been authored against its requirements. Component testing is performed with tools and practices that ought to be applicable to languages the agile teams use and the kinds of systems they are constructing. Finally, system and performance testing is geared toward evaluating the system in its entirety, often by testing it against other systems that may not even be accessible to the team. The point of all these testing practices is for the team to add a small amount of code and ascertain within hours that the system still fulfills all the needs that have been imposed on it to date, and teams commit a certain amount to time within an iteration to "hardening," in which the activities that need to be done before the system is ready for release are carried out.
Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


Re-Centering the Research Computing Enterprise
Educause Review (06/06) Vol. 41, No. 3, P. 84; McRobbie, Michael A.

The key issue for institutional central data centers has shifted from physical size and floor space to reliable power and heat management, writes Indiana University interim provost and vice president for academic affairs Michael A. McRobbie. But he argues against the decentralized data center management that many schools and departments are calling for, and posits instead that data center centralization is more critical than ever, particularly as it relates to research computing. "I assert that these resources could be used much more efficiently and effectively to provide a better quality of services supporting an even larger amount of excellent research," McRobbie attests. A coordinated, central strategy for supporting IT in research will help institutions facing unaffordable data center costs by prioritizing research requirements, coordinating grant submissions, and helping fund cyberinfrastructure needs through the use of indirect cost recoveries. "Through a coordinated, centralized approach, the resources that departments use to run their own systems can be reallocated and pooled to achieve economies of scale and to serve populations incrementally larger than the combined departmental headcount," says McRobbie, adding that this model can enable the delivery of centralized maintenance and support services at less cost and higher quality of service. He suggests that CIOs ask themselves if such an approach can yield improved research computing for all stakeholders, and recommends that the CIO undertake cyberinfrastructure planning in collaboration with the leading institutional researchers. Given the specialization of data center design, it makes sense for CIOs to hire design engineers who can effectively structure centers that address both present and future needs.
Click Here to View Full Article
to the top


Web Browsing on Small-Screen Devices: A Multiclient Collaborative Approach
IEEE Pervasive Computing (06/06) Vol. 5, No. 2, P. 78; Hua, Zhigang; Lu, Hanqing

Zhigang Hua and Hanqing Lu of the Chinese Academy of Science's Institute of Automation propose a method to make Web browsing on small-screen devices a less tedious prospect for users with a new multiclient collaborative system featuring a two-level browsing arrangement. The system automatically builds an aggregation profile during the initialization of the multiclient communication in an ambient environment, and the devices involved in the Web interactions are designated as either master devices (the device currently being employed for Web browsing) and slave devices (the ambient devices operating collaboratively based on the user's Web interactions on the master device). Communication between devices in an ambient environment is maintained by a communication supporter, while a user's Web browsing interactions on the master device are monitored by an interaction watcher. The detected interaction is then fed into a collaboration translator, whose job is to parse user interactions into correlating display updates on slave devices. The last component of the system is a slave device-based collaboration performer, which automatically displays data updates from the master device on a client browser. The browsing scheme features within-page browsing and between-page comparative browsing; the first browsing model involves the display of a thumbnail overview by a master device and the display of detailed content by a slave device. The arrangement allows the user to easily choose a different block on the master device, causing the detailed content to be displayed on another slave device. In the between-page comparative browsing model, the master device displays one page and the allows the user to scroll for more information while the slave device shows the comparative page and automatically scrolls to the matched term of interest.
Click Here to View Full Article - Web Link to Publication Homepage
to the top


To submit feedback about ACM TechNews, contact: technews@hq.acm.org

To unsubscribe from the ACM TechNews Early Alert Service: Please send a separate email to listserv@listserv.acm.org with the line

signoff technews

in the body of your message.

Please note that replying directly to this message does not automatically unsubscribe you from the TechNews list.

ACM may have a different email address on file for you, so if you're unable to "unsubscribe" yourself, please direct your request to: technews-request@ acm.org

We will remove your name from the TechNews list on your behalf.

For help with technical problems, including problems with leaving the list, please write to: technews-request@acm.org

to the top

News Abstracts © 2006 Information, Inc.


© 2006 ACM, Inc. All rights reserved. ACM Privacy Policy.

About ACM | Contact us | Boards & Committees | Press Room | Membership | Privacy Policy | Code of Ethics | System Availability | Copyright © 2014, ACM, Inc.